New Resources for Foreign Language: Mango Languages / Transparent Language Online

November 3 2017, by Carrie Dunham-LaGree

Whether you want to learn a new foreign language or practice a familiar one, there are two new databases to help you: Mango Languages and Transparent Language Online.

Mango Languages is an interactive database that provides lesson plans for 72 different languages. To track your progress, create an account. Mango conveniently tracks your learning yours, the courses you studies, and the lessons you’ve completed. Each lesson begins with conversational goals and grammar goals.

 

Transparent Language Online is a language-learning service offering over 90 language options. Note: users must create a free account to use (click “Sign up” to create an account). To create an account, you must be on campus and connected to Drake Wifi.

Literature Resource Center and LitFinder (Gale)

September 29 2017, by Andrew Welch

Literature Resource Center (LRC) is one of several new literature databases Cowles Library has added to help support all types of literary research. These databases expand our online access to literary criticism, critical reviews, author biographies, along with thousands of poems, plays, and works of short fiction. LRC includes biographical information about authors and literary criticism of authors’ works from dozens of sources. LRC covers a wide range of literature–not just fiction–from all time periods and from around the world.

LRC also includes several tools that help you establish the context surrounding authors and their works.

  • Topic Finder is a graphical way of displaying the context of your term, which can lead to connections you may not have otherwise considered.
  • Term Frequency shows the trend of one or more terms over time.
  • Criticism Over Time (image, below) displays a timeline of literary criticism for a particular work and allows you to jump right to critical essays from a given year.

Criticism Over Time in Literature Resource Center

You can use LRC in conjunction with LitFinder, which provides access to the full text of thousands of poems and short stories. Visit our LRC Research Guide and LitFinder Research Guide for more information and video tutorials.

Cowles Library adds dozens of new resources in 2017!

September 12 2017, by Teri Koch

Cowles Library has added dozens of new resources in almost every subject category of interest to Drake students and researchers. We have created a full list, plus specialized lists based on major/discipline (and interdisciplinary, too!) Check them out at: http://researchguides.drake.edu/2017


Health and Wellness Resource Center (Gale)

September 6 2017, by Priya Shenoy

The Health and Wellness Resource Center by Gale is a consumer health resource with access to many full-text health science databases which contain more than 1,000 medical journals, periodicals, and articles from more than 2,200 general-interest publications, medical newspapers, newsletters and news feeds.  Additionally, this resource has streaming videos with transcripts from Healthology, Illumistream, NBC and ORLive.

Most importantly though, it has access to a variety of electronic full-text dictionaries and encyclopedias including:

  1. The Gale Encyclopedia of Alternative Medicine
  2. The Gale Encyclopedia of Surgery and Medical Tests
  3. The Gale Encyclopedia of Genetic Disorders
  4. The Gale Encyclopedia of Cancer
  5. The Medical and Health Information Directory
  6. Medical Health Information Directory
  7. Merriam-Webster’s Medical Desk Dictionary
  8. various Thomson Healthcare and Micromedex drug guides.

 

However, this database is partially searchable in SuperSearch.

New resource: Gale Academic OneFile

August 29 2017, by Bruce Gilbert

New to Drake University for the 2017/18 academic year, Gale Academic OneFile is a premier source for peer-reviewed, full-text articles from the world’s leading journals and reference sources. With extensive coverage of the physical sciences, technology, medicine, social sciences, the arts, theology, literature and other subjects, Academic OneFile is both authoritative and comprehensive. Content includes millions of articles available in both PDF and HTML full-text with no restrictions from over 13,000 journals. Content is updated daily, so you won’t have to wait for the information you’re looking for.

Cool features include the topic finder, which generates a visual search result by topic and subtopic based on an analysis of frequently occurring and related terms in your results. It’s a great way to quickly assess your topic, find relevant articles, and discover new connections between your topic and others. You’ll find Topic Finder at the top of Academic OneFile’s home page.

Library Faculty on University Committees

July 26 2017, by Bruce Gilbert

Library Faculty participation on Faculty Senate Committees for 2017-2018

Every member of the Cowles Library Faculty is on one (or more) standing Drake Faculty Senate Committee(s), or other standing University-wide committee. Faculty committee participation is as follows (in random order):

Hope Bibens – Intercollegiate Athletics

Bruce Gilbert – University Benefits Committee

Teri Koch – University Budget Committee

Sam Becker – Admissions Committee

Bart Schmidt – Academic Freedom and Tenure

Dan Chibnall – Compensation

Carrie Dunham-LaGree – University Curriculum Committee (Chair)

Priya Shenoy – DCAC

Marcia Keyser – IRB

Mark Stumme – Academic Freedom and Tenure (alternate)

Andrew Welch – Senate IT Committee

Also, Carrie Dunham-LaGree and Teri Koch will serve as Faculty Senators for the coming year, with Teri serving as Cowles’s Senate Exec representative

Also, in terms of other standing University-wide groups, Cameron Tuai is a member of GEAC (Global Engagement Advisory Committee) and Marcia Keyser is a member of the Jterm Oversight Committee.

Sam Becker is also the newly-appointed Equity Partner from Cowles Library; she will be working with Erin Lain, Associate Provost, Campus Equity & Inclusion, in this role.

Eighteenth Century Collections Online (ECCO)

April 13 2017, by Andrew Welch

This post is part of a series of “Resources and Services” posts from the Faculty of Cowles Library.


What You’ll Find in ECCODeclaration of Independence, 4 July 1776, by John Trumbull

Eighteenth Century Collections Online (ECCO) includes primary source content from over 200,000 books, pamphlets, essays, broadsides, and other documents:

  • printed from 1701 to 1800;
  • printed in the British Isles, Colonial America, the United States of America (1776-1800), Canada, or British territories, in all languages;
  • printed in any other part of the world, wholly or partly in English or other British vernacular.

The foundation of ECCO comprises publications from the Eighteenth-Century Short Title Catalog (ESTC) project. In 1977, the British Library and the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies began a joint project whose aim was “to create a machine-readable union catalogue of books, pamphlets and other ephemeral material printed in English-speaking countries from 1701 to 1800.” [1] The project was later expanded to digitize and include publications dating back to 1473 (and was renamed the English Short Title Catalog), but the ECCO database contains the ESTC content from 1701-1800.

ECCO presents content as images of original book pages. You can search the text of these pages and download up to 250 pages as PDF files. ECCO contains content supporting research in literature, history, music, religion, medicine, law, linguistics, fine arts, and more.

Searching ECCO

Like most databases, ECCO provides a Basic and Advanced search. The Basic Search allows you to search for terms in the Keyword, Title, Subject, and Author fields, or within the pages of the documents themselves. You can enter a date limit and choose from one or more subject areas.

The Advanced search allows you to do all of the above, as well as combine terms from different fields, specify additional search fields (e.g., Publisher, Place of Publication), limit by Language, limit by Illustration type, and apply a “Fuzzy Search” option. Fuzzy Search looks for near matches and variant spellings of your search terms. Because of the variant spellings often found in historical documents, as well as the possibility of scanning errors during digitization, we recommend setting Fuzzy Search to at least Low.

Research Tools in ECCO

Be sure to consult ECCO’s Research Tools to explore detailed and carefully crafted Historical Contexts. These documents are essentially entries from reference works on a topic (e.g., French Revolution, War of American Independence, Slavery and the Slave Trade, Enlightenment) that present an overview of the topic within the context of the eighteenth century.

The Key Documents section provides an overview of what you can expect to find on a given topic in ECCO, where the collection’s strengths lie, and a list of important works (including links) in that subject area. Here, for example, is an excerpt from the “History and Geography” Key Document overview:

The history and geography collection, although rich in titles on English life and history, spans the world as it was known to eighteenth-century historians and travelers. It is particularly strong in ancient history, including many editions of Edward Gibbon’s masterpiece, The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. The user will also find numerous histories of Scotland, Ireland, Wales, and the nations and states of Europe (with particular strength in histories of the Scandinavian countries), as well as histories of Russia. The collection is strong in titles on the French Revolution, particularly English responses to it.

If you have questions about how to use Eighteenth Century Collections Online, reach out to a librarian.

Ambrose Digital Streaming Video

April 6 2017, by Claudia Frazer

Need to convince your audience about the realities of global warming? Take a look at the extensive collection of streaming video clips available on Ambrose Digital Streaming Video. “Arctic with Bruce Parry” is just one of several series dealing with our changing climate. In this five part stunning series Bruce Parry journeys around the Arctic Circle to explore the lives of its many peoples in a rapidly changing world. Episodes include such locations as Siberia, Alaska, Canada, Greenland and Northern Europe.

Ambrose Digital Streaming Video is a collection of streaming video clips and full programs. The database includes all 37 of Shakespeare’s plays produced by BBC as well as additional films in history, social sciences, literature, fine arts, and the sciences.

  • All videos include synchronized captions, compliant with requirements of section 508
  • All closed captions are searchable
    Unlimited streams, unlimited simultaneous users
  • Public performance rights are included
  • 8 citation styles (APA, Harvard, MLA, MHRA, Chicago, CBE/CSE, Bluebook, AMA)
  • Viewable on all devices

46 new BBC programs now available:

  • Arctic with Bruce Parry – A World of Extremes:  Travel to the Arctic Circle, Greenland, Canada, Alaska, Russia and Northern Europe to explore the people and the effects of Global Warming. Five 50-minute Programs
  • Death Camp Treblinka – Survivor Stories:  Two men bear final witness. One 50-minute Program
  • Nature’s Microworlds:  Discover the key to life in the Galapagos, the Serengeti, Svalbard, and the Amazon. Sixteen 30-minute Programs
  • Rise of the Continents:  Discover the supercontinent that split apart to create 7 continents. Four 60-minute Programs
  • Shakespeare in Italy:  Travelogue Reveals the myths and stories that inspired Shakespeare. Two 50-minute Programs
  • Brazil with Michael Palin:  Meet the people and places that shape this nation. Four 55-minute Programs
  • Fierce Earth, Series 1:  Experience some of nature’s most destructive forces–earthquakes, tsunamis, etc. Ten 30-minute Programs
  • Orbit – Earth’s Extraordinary Journey:  Follow the Earth’s voyage around the Sun for one complete orbit. Three 60-minute Programs
  • Secret Universe:  Journey Inside the Cell:  Narrated by David Tennant, a high tech adventure inside our own cells. One 50-minute Program

 

Learn About: GREENR

March 27 2017, by Dan Chibnall

Some science-based databases are extremely large and cover such a wide variety of topics that it can be difficult to navigate them and find what you need. GREENR, the Global Reference on the Environment, Energy, and Natural Resources, is a more focused database that allows you to easily locate helpful material.

GREENR’s browsing features are especially helpful. The database opens on a page with a concise set of bulleted lists, featuring the major areas it covers. These areas include: energy systems, health care, food, climate change, population, economic development, resource management, ecology, science and technology, humans in the natural world, and social factors. Below is an example of some of the bulleted lists featuring areas of research, news, and statistics.

Browsing Subjects in GREENR

Another nice feature is the browsable world map. The map allows you to focus on a particular country or region of the world and learn about its energy use, emissions, ecological footprint, and other environment-related data and studies. Plus by focusing on each country you can also see a list of academic journal articles and statistics that relate to research done in or about that particular nation. Below you will see an example focused on the nation of Canada. Statistics and other materials are located within the full overview of the nation.

Country Info in GREENR

In terms of types of resources, GREENR offers a wide variety of formats. You will be able to find current news articles, case studies, videos, scholarly journal articles, commentaries, primary source documents, statistics, and visualizations and infographics based on the statistics located within. Click here to see an example of an academic journal article within GREENR. Below you will see a list of the most recent news and academic articles located within GREENR.

Academic Material in GREENR

GREENR is a great database option for people in the STEM fields but also helpful for those in business, sociology, law, or politics as well. Give it a try and contact us at Cowles Library if you have any questions about it.

Two Days Away (March 4-5, 2017)

March 15 2017, by Karl Schaefer

I have been trying to keep myself on track with all the varied activities I have promised to undertake during my stay in Germany. So far, I think I’ve done pretty well. One month into my residence, I have completed one of three planned research trips, participated in one of two seminar sessions and done some writing. I think that’s not bad, but from experience I know that all of a sudden, one looks up and the time has all gone with too much left to do. A bad feeling.

Wanting to do whatever I can to prevent this from occurring, I set off this past Saturday (March 4th) for Munich where two more block prints reside. It’s a six hour train ride from Hamburg to Munich so not possible to do in one day. I had recently re-established contact with a former professor of mine from graduate school who has spent most of his professional life at Goethe University in Frankfurt. When he learned that I was going to be in Germany, we arranged to meet and since Frankfurt lies between Hamburg and Munich, this was a perfect opportunity.

I spent a very pleasant evening and morning reminiscing with David King and his wife Pat—I had not seen them in thirty years!—and then continued my journey south. In Munich, I spent the night in a small hotel which was so tucked away that it took me a good half an hour to find the street it was on. Even the locals weren’t exactly sure where Amalienstrasse was! In desperation, I walked into a competing hotel and the desk clerk cheerfully told me my hotel was in the next street!

This morning (Monday, March 6th), I walked the three short blocks to Ludwigstrasse, a grand, wide thoroughfare lined with Gothic piles of tooled stone to find the Staatsbibliothek, the state library.

After going through the obligatory check-in, shedding my jacket, hat, and briefcase, and sliding the pieces of paper, ruler, and magnifying glass into the transparent plastic bag I was given, I was admitted to the manuscript reading room where I spent two intense hours examining the block prints. The librarian who had discovered these block prints, Helga Rebhan, came out to greet me and introduce herself. We arranged to meet for coffee after I had finished looking at the block prints and we had a very informative conversation during the course of which she told me that she knew of another example that a colleague of hers had seen in southwestern China! The story of the block prints grows ever more intriguing…

Helga was able to provide a bit of general information about the Staatsbibliothek as well: ten million, that’s TEN MILLION volumes of print plus a couple hundred thousand manuscripts. The building was put up between 1832 and 1839 and is glorious both inside and out. The outside is solid stone, made to last; the inside has high ceilings and broad staircases. The reading rooms have all been modernized, but in a tasteful way; comfortable seating is everywhere and there’s plenty of light. It was busy on that Monday morning, due in part to the fact that the university is just a stone’s throw away down Ludwigstrasse. But the manuscript reading room was populated as well.

Very impressive all in all.

Now I’m on the train again, headed back to Hamburg and my apartment. I’d like to think I could kick back for a couple of days, but the fear of running out of time makes that seem unlikely. A cousin of mine comes to visit for four days at the end of the week and then we’re into the second week of March already. Nearly half of my time here will be gone. So, it looks like I’ll have to press on for a while before I can put my feet up.

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